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What Is Exercise Induced Asthma

Exercise-induced asthma is characterized as intermittent narrowing of the airways, as shown by a decrease in some degree of flow, wheezing, chest tightness, coughing, and difficulty breathing that is triggered by exercise. After exercise, which is often > or = 13-15% for forced expiratory volume in a second (FEV-), a definitive diagnosis needs to be made. According to prevalence studies, this disorder is both present in recreational sports and in elite athletes. Many people who suffer from exercise-induced asthma may be able to participate and compete at the highest level of success with treatment.

What Is Exercise Induced Asthma

Exercise-induced asthma is characterized as intermittent narrowing of the airways, as shown by a decrease in some degree of flow, wheezing, chest tightness, coughing, and difficulty breathing that is triggered by exercise.

Introduction

During physical exertion, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) occurs, which leads to a narrowing of the airway.[1][2] EIB is present in 40% to 90% of people with asthma and up to 20% of those without asthma.[1][3][4] The benefits of regular exercise for all people are well-established, and fitness is an integral part of a healthy lifestyle. People with EIB may avoid exercise due to symptoms of exhaustion, cough, chest tightness, and wheezing. Exercise avoidance has been shown to raise social anxiety in adolescents, and it can lead to obesity and poor health.[3] Exercise has been shown to reduce EIB severity, respiratory function, and airway inflammation in people with asthma and EIB.[3][2] Early detection, diagnosis and treatment can lead to improved quality of life, and patients can participate in exercise without limiting competition at the elite level.
[3][/5]: Non-pharmacologic treatments targeting the root of EIB, an acute rise in ventilation and demand on the respiratory system, include warm-up exercises and shielding the airway from cold, dry air, pollutants, and allergens are suggested. Short-acting beta-agonists (SABA), inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA), and mast cell stabilizing agents (MCSA) are among the pharmacologic agents targeted at the symptomatic bronchoconstriction process.

Etiology

A transient airway narrowing occurs during physical exertion, according to exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). The name EIB has been favoured over exercise-induced asthma (EIA), as well as the American Academy/College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. EIB with asthma (EIBa) and EIB without asthma can be denoted, as well as EIB without asthma (EIBwa).[1][2] It is a result of an unprecedented rise in the amount of air entering the airways that necessitate heating and humidifying. This results in inflammatory, neuronal, and vascular changes, which culminated in the bronchial smooth muscle’s contraction and signs of dyspnea, cough, chest tightness, mucus production, and wheezing in vulnerable individuals.

What Is It?

EIB is a form of asthma that occurs during or after exercise, which is explained by the common term: exercise-induced asthma. Shortness of breath is inevitably a result of exercise and other strenuous activities. In people with or without asthma, heavy breathing and dehydration can narrow the airways to the lungs. Brochoconstriction is the medical term used to describe this narrowing. However, bronchoconstriction has a greater effect in asthma sufferers than in others. People with asthma have airway inflammation and increased mucus production. These factors narrow the airways, making breathing particularly difficult. Exercise can cause bronchoconstriction, wheezing, coughing, and chest pains, which can be mild to severe. EIB is present in up to 90% of people with asthma during exercise. According to the AAFA, EIB may be one of the most common causes of asthma in teenagers and young adults. The overwhelming majority of asthmatics have a mild form that responds well to therapy. However, in 5–10 percent of asthma sufferers, the condition is chronic, which means that symptoms do not respond well to therapy. Most people with EIB are able to control their symptoms and resume exercising and doing other daily activities. Preventive steps and medications can help prevent asthma attacks during or after exercise.

Treatment

The first step toward coping with EIB is to consult a doctor and develop a treatment plan. Many asthma medications can help prevent asthma attacks even during exercise. In addition, a person with asthma can treat any EIB symptoms with short-acting drugs. Anyone with regular EIB should consult with their healthcare specialist, particularly if any symptoms do not subside or respond well to a rescue inhaler.

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