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What Exercise Strengthens Your Knees

According to the Cleveland Clinic, 18 million people see a knee pain specialist each year. Gentle stretching and strengthening exercises can help your knee joint. If your knee pain is related to an injury, arthritis, or arthritis, gentle stretching can help reduce the pain while also improving your flexibility and range of motion. We’ll take you through some of the most popular exercises to improve your knee and reduce knee pain in this series. According to the Cleveland Clinic, there are several ways to treat knee pain that can be done on the doctor’s dime.

What Exercise Strengthens Your Knees

Half squats are a great way to develop your quadriceps, glutes, and hamstrings without straining your knees. To do this exercise: Stand in a standing squat position with your feet shoulder-width apart. For balance, place your hands on your hips or out in front of you.

Exercise And Knee Pain

If your knee pain is related to an injury, surgery, or arthritis, gentle stretching and strengthening exercises can help reduce the pain while also improving your flexibility and range of motion. Exerciseing a knee that has been injured or arthritic may seem counterintuitive, but in fact, exercise is better for your knee than holding it. Not moving your knee will cause it to stiffen, and doing so will make it more difficult to go about your daily activities. Gentle stretching and strengthening exercises can help your knee joint. Having stronger muscles can reduce the impact and strain on your knee and help your knee joint move more smoothly. Be sure to consult with your doctor or physical therapist before starting an exercise program for knee pain to ensure that the exercises are safe for you. They may make some changes based on your situation.

Stretching Exercises

Lower body stretching exercises, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, may help improve your knee joint mobility and flexibility. Moving your knee will be much simpler. Warming up takes place before you start stretching. Cycling on a stationary bike, walking, or using an elliptical machine are all viable warm-up options. Once you’re warmed up, do the following three stretches and then repeat them after you’ve finished the knee strengthening exercises. Try to do these stretches and exercises every week. Heel and Calf Stretch This stretch is designed to stretch the muscles in your lower leg, particularly your calf muscles. Place your hands on the wall and step one foot forward as far as you can comfortably. Both feet should be facing forward, heels flat, with a slight bend in your knees. Lean into the stretch and hold for 30 seconds. Your back leg should be able to stretch. Repeat legs and repeat. Both legs must be stretched twice during this stretch. Stretching your quadriceps This stretch specifically targets your quadriceps and the muscles at the front of your thighs. Performing this exercise will help with your hip flexors and quadricep muscles. Your feet should be shoulder-width apart. Bend one knee so your foot goes up toward your glutes. As far as you can comfortably, grab your ankle and gently pull it toward your glutes. Return to the starting position and change legs. On each side, repeat 2 times. Hamstring strain This stretch targets your hamstrings and the muscles in the back of your thigh. This stretch should be felt in the back of your leg and up to the top of your glutes. If you flex your foot, you may also feel the strain in your calves. Both legs should be straightened and Lie down on the floor or mat and straighten both legs. Or, if it’s more convenient, bend both knees with your feet flat on the ground. Lift one leg off the ground. Place your hands behind your thigh but below the knee, and slowly pull your knee toward your chest until you feel a slight stretch. This shouldn’t be painful. Legs are lower and change legs. On each side, repeat 2 times.

1. Exercise Regularly

Exercise increases bone density and muscle endurance, which surrounds your joints, according to A. Lynn Millar, PhD, professor of physical therapy at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. Any form of exercise can be used to build and maintain joint fitness, but weight-bearing activities are better for bone density building,” Millar says. “Walking, running, and cycling are all viable options.”

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